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Forensic photography (sometimes referred to as crime scene photography) is the art of producing an accurate reproduction of a crime scene for the benefit of a court. It is part of the process of evidence collecting. It provides investigators with photos of bodies, places, items involved in the crime. Photography of this kind is highly technical in nature, though not in an aesthetic sense. It involves choosing corrected lighting, accurate angling of lenses, and a collection of many angles of view. Measurement of elements of crime scenes often takes place in cooperation with crime scene photography. Crime scene photographers capture images in both color and black and white. Various forces and different countries have different policies in regards to 35 mm film or digital photography. There are advantages & disadvantages to both.

Forensic photography

Pictures as evidence must be:

  1. Fit for court
  2. A true record
  3. Untampered

Court Presentation.

The images must be clear and usually have scales. They serve to not only remind CSEs and investigators of the scene but also to provide a tangible image for the court to better enable them to understand what happened.

Overall images do not have scales and serve to show the general layout (e.g. the house where the murder is thought to have occurred). Context images show evidence in context (e.g. how the knife was next to the sofa). Close up images show fine detail of an artefact (e.g. a bloody fingerprint on the knife).**

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